Tuesday, 29 May 2018

Hear Me Howl review - Plymouth Fringe Festival



Hear Me Howl kicked off Plymouth Fringe Festival this week at the Barbican Theatre. 

Written by Lydia Rynne, Directed by Kay Michael and produced by Caley Powell of Lights Down Productions.

Jess (performed by Alice Pitt- Carter) is on the brink of turning 30 and is launched into a world of the unknown. 

She tells her story from behind a shiny drum kit, before her first ever gig of her brand new band which she joins as a way of putting her intimidating adult life on hold. 

Jess' "late coming of age story" blossoms from an unbelievably average office day job (where the next order of paper clips is the top of her to-do list) to strong, feminist- protesting rockstar by the end. 

The continuous monologue explains the blips of turning 30; the realistic and emotional complexities that aren't particularly well advertised among theatre - the topics, though moving, were refreshing to see discussed on stage. 

Jess is a fierce millennial who shows great feminist qualities. She's witty, charming and relatable - all the attributes to ensure that the audience are rooting for her throughout the show. 
Alice Pitt- Carter portrays her with a fantastic, infectious energy. She handles the vivacious to emotional tone changes well, making it totally believable. 

The show is simple. Just the actress sat behind a drum kit, house lights up and a continuous monologue of thoughts. The writing is funny, real and beautifully put.  It's also Pitt- Carter's ability to hold the audience with Rynne's wonderful words that captivates so effortlessly. 


Fringe theatre is a great pick 'n' mix and I'm so glad that I managed to catch Hear Me Howl. It feels like a really special piece of theatre that should be seen by many. It celebrates how bloody awesome women are, whatever path they choose to take. I'm looking forward to seeing what this show does next. 

Ellie Mae 

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